Sudden Rush

 Image Source: Sudden Rush Facebook Page, 2014,  Image URL

Image Source: Sudden Rush Facebook Page, 2014, Image URL

Bio: Blending Hawaiian chant and English lyrics with hip-hop's gritty dance beat, Sudden Rush create a polished, urban sound on songs that explore topical Hawaiian issues like sovereignty, drug use, and cultural pride. This is no weak imitation of black rap music, but an exciting, innovative hybrid enhanced by guest appearances of such island talent as Keali'i Reichel, Willie K, John Cruz and 'Ehukai.

Employing the space and freedom of rap music, Sudden Rush bombards the listener with a stream of provocative ideas. On highlights like "True Hawaiian" they indict our government for injustices against Native Americans, Africans and Hawaiians. "I strain to ease the pain that my people feel," they rap, "charge grand larceny, Uncle Sam better wash his hands because they're filthy. I can't believe how the government chooses to deceive the people." On the somber "Think About It," they draw attention to the drowning of activist George Helm - "a couple of brothers trying to save Kahoolawe lost at sea, we know the real story."

Founded in Hilo, Sudden Rush comprises Don Ke'ala Kawa'auhau Jr., Shane Veincent, and Caleb Richards.

"A lot of people thought the music and the message wouldn't go together," says Kawa'auhau who raps in Hawaiian and works as a Hawaiian language teacher at Hilo's Punana Leo school. "We're all part Hawaiian and the sovereignty issue is coming to the forefront, and we felt we could reach people who maybe don't like to read about it through the medium of music. The message is be proud of who you are no matter what race, and respect the traditions and culture and look at what happened in the past without dwelling on the past. So we try to tell the history as best as we can but not in a mean way, not be angry, and learn how to move on."

Editors Note: Bio taken direct from Sudden Rush. One of the more political bands of the early era whose music was heavily tied into native Hawaiian sovereignty and empowerment movements.